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Nature reserves

North-eastern Twente consists of the municipalities of Tubbergen, Dinkelland, Oldenzaal and Losser. The north-eastern part has a border with Germany; the south-western part borders with the band of cities that is Enschede, Hengelo, Borne and Almelo.

North-eastern Twente has been designated as a national landscape, due to its rolling landscape, which is incredibly varied thanks to an intricate combination of streams, ashes, enclosed fields and cultivated marshland. Rows of trees, canals and woodland create the green enclosed spaces that are so distinctive when compared with the open spaces in the north and east of the Netherlands. Its status as a national landscape allows north-eastern Twente to maintain the unique identity of this special area. Characteristic of the area is the diverse, small-scale and contrasting landscape. In combination with cultural-historical elements, the dazzling landscape gives north-eastern Twente its own identity. Therefore, it’s certainly worth your time when exploring the area!

Lutterzand

An absolute highlight in the region in terms of its combination of nature, relaxation and enjoyment. Lutterzand is synonymous with enjoyable outings, paddling in the river Dinkel, and discovering nature. Discover it yourself!

Singraven

The Singraven estate is beautifully located along the Dinkel, close to the village of Denekamp. The estate features many interesting monumental buildings, among which are the stately Singraven house and an age-old, three-cogged watermill. The Singraven estate offers a diverse landscape with woodland, lanes, cultivated fields, meadows, marshland, and the ever-present Dinkel. As a result, the estate has a surprising amount to offer; fascinating cultural history, calming and interesting nature, active leisure opportunities, such as cycling or walking routes, and much more.

The Singraven estate is beautifully located along the Dinkel, close to the village of Denekamp. The estate features many interesting monumental buildings, among which are the stately Singraven house and and centuries-old, three-cogged watermill. Singraven Estate offers a diverse landscape with woodland, lanes, cultivated fields, meadows, marshland, and the ever-present Dinkel. As a result, the estate has a surprising amount to offer; fascinating cultural history, calming and interesting nature, active leisure opportunities, like cycling or walking routes, and much more. The Singraven estate was first mentioned in 1381 as the agrarian farm house Hof ten Singraven, which was the property of the bishop of Utrecht at the time. He lent it to third parties, among whom Beguines from Oldenzaal. In 1398, the house came into possession of the Hondenberg family, who built the house into a manor in 1415. In the following centuries, Singraven belonged to the counts of Bentheim and the aristocratic Sloet family, who had the house - derelict at the time - entirely demolished and reconstructed in 1651. Following its respective inheritance and sale, the manor successively fell into the hands of the families De Thouars, Roessingh Udink and Laan. Willem Frederik Jan Laan, the last private inhabitant/owner, had extensive renovations and restorations conducted, both on the house itself and other parts of the estate. On top of that, he built an enormous art and antiques collection, which can still be viewed in the house. Although the (childless) Mr Laan continued to live in Singraven until his death in 1966, he donated the property to the Edwina van Heek Foundation in 1956. Until 31 March 2017, there is a tour of Singraven house that starts every Thursday at 14:00. From 1 April to 31 October 2017, there are tours of Singraven house every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, starting at 11:00 and 14:00. There are additional tours on the following Saturdays: 1 April, 13 May, 3 June, all Saturdays in July and August, 9 September and 7 October at 14:00. Tour duration: 1.5 hours. Admission: €8 per person (combined admission incl. adjoining park €10). Children younger than twelve are only allowed to enter under the supervision of an adult. For groups of up to ten people, there is the option of visiting the house all year round (only on request). Admission is €7.50 per person for groups.

Dal van Mosbeek (Mosbeek Valley)

This nature reserve with a surface area of 51 hectares is located in Mander, to the north of the village of Vasse. The area features rich and unique vegetation. And is most certainly worth visiting if you’re in Twente!

This nature reserve with a surface area of 51 hectares is located in Mander, to the north of the village of Vasse. After Tubbergen, take a left once you've passed the church in Vasse, onto Hooidijk. Take a left at the junction at Restaurant De Liskoel onto Oosteriksweg. Here, you will quickly find signposts for the car park of the Bels mill. The reserve contains the grounds along De Mosbeek estate, the heathland and woodland of the Galgenberg and Mander’s Streu. There are also various sites on Manderse Es and grounds surrounding the Eendenbeek valley with old hedge- and tree rows and coppicing parcels. The Bels and Frans watermills are also in the nature reserve.
The area features rich and unique vegetation.
The information centre is set up in the Frans mill.
The Bels mill houses an exposition about mills.

Springendal

Springendal is a beautiful nature reserve excellent for cycling and walking. Springendal is a nature reserve on a push moraine. The area is roughly 335 hectares in size and is situated to the north and south of the Hooidijk in Vasse. The area has two country estates, Springendal and Braamberg, and several stream valleys. It is a diverse agricultural landscape boasting a variety of woodland, heathland, agricultural land, streams, springs, ponds and farms.

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